Symphony Concert 20

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam | Bernard Haitink

Mahler

Thu, 06.09.19.30No. 18339

KKL Luzern, Concert Hall

Vergangenes Konzert


Please book a wheelchair ticket under t +41 (0) 41 226 44 80 (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

Summer Festival

17.08.-16.09. 2018

 

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    Symphony Concert 20

    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam | Bernard Haitink

    Bernard Haitink  conductor
    Gustav Mahler (1860–1911)
    Symphony No. 9 in D major

    Bernard Haitink has shaped the history of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra like no other conductor in the decades following the Second World War. He helmed this phenomenal orchestra from Amsterdam for nearly three decades, creating a sensation with his interpretations of the Mahler symphonies in particular. Now, at the age of 89, he will perform Mahler's deeply moving Ninth Symphony once again in Lucerne. This is the last symphony that Mahler was able to complete before his death in 1911. The young Alban Berg, an enthusiastic admirer of the older composer, considered the Ninth to be "the most glorious" work that Mahler had ever created. Its music conveys the melancholy of farewell while at the same time seeming to open a vista into another, better world. In his score sketch, Mahler noted down such expressions as "O time of youth! Vanished! O love! Disappeared." The phrase "Leb' wohl!" ("Farewell!") appears twice. For this Lucerne performance, Haitink will take stock of a long life spent with Mahler's music. When he conducted the Ninth last year in London, the Guardian wrote that Haitink "usher[ed] it towards its faltering close" with a rare degree of "care and gentle humanity."


    Please note the following change of conductor and program for the concert of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam on 6 September:

    The symphony concert 20 on 6 September will be led by Bernard Haitink. Instead of the originally planned programme, the orchestra will perform Gustav Mahler’s Ninth Symphony.

    The change of cast is necessary because the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam has terminated the cooperation with chief conductor Daniele Gatti with immediate effect.

    Tickets for the concert remain valid. We are very grateful to Bernard Haitink that he can take over on such short notice.

    You can purchase the digital concert program here.

    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam

    The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam (RCO) was founded in 1888 as the Concertgebouw Orkest to mark the dedication of Amsterdam’s concert hall; since its 100th birthday in 1988, its name has included the adjective “royal.” In the first five decades of its history, the RCO was decisively shaped by Willem Mengelberg, who established its great Mahler tradition. “Truly splendid, full of youthful freshness and enthusiasm,” was Richard Strauss’s assessment of the ensemble in 1897. Dozens of composers have ascended the RCO’s podium ever since: from Mahler, Debussy, Bartók, and Stravinsky through Berio, Nono, and Henze to – in recent years – George Benjamin, Oliver Knussen, Tan Dun, Thomas Adès, and Michel van der Aa. Internationally renowned conductors have also regularly performed in Amsterdam, from Pierre Monteux, Bruno Walter, and Otto Klemperer through Sir Georg Solti, George Szell, and Eugen Jochum to the podium stars of our own time. Eduard van Beinum was the first to helm the RCO as Music Director following the Second World War; his successors have included Bernard Haitink (1961–1988), Riccardo Chailly (1988–2004), Mariss Jansons (2004–2015), and Daniele Gatti (2016–2018). The RCO tours regularly and will give a series of concerts in the United States in February 2019. The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra today comprises 120 members from 25 nations. By the end of 2018, as part of the “RCO Meets Europe” project, it will have traveled to all 28 countries of the European Union in order to reaffirm the idea of international understanding and the unity of the Continent. Some 1,100 recordings on LP, CD, and DVD, which since 2004 have been released on the Orchestra’s in-house “RCO live” label, document the RCO’s artistic achievements. The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra is generously supported by ING Group and Unilever.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 3 September 1972 in a program of music by Stravinsky and Bruckner’s Seventh Symphony under Bernard Haitink.

    Further information: www.concertgebouw.nl

    August 2018

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    Bernard Haitink

    Bernard Haitink was born in 1929 in Amsterdam. Trained as a violinist, he appeared on the podium for the first time in 1954 to conduct the Netherlands Radio Symphony Orchestra. In 1956 he made his debut with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam, which in 1961 appointed him Music Director. For 27 years he had full responsibility there, and he is currently Honorary Conductor of the orchestra, with which he most recently (in June 2018) performed Mahler’s Ninth Symphony. Haitink has also held leadership positions with the London Philharmonic Orchestra (1967–79), the Glyndebourne Festival (1977–88), the Royal Opera House in London (1987–2002), and the Staatskapelle Dresden (2002–04) and has served as Principal Conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (2006–10). As a guest conductor, Haitink regularly conducts the Berlin and Vienna Philharmonics, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. In the 2017-18 season, he additionally worked with the London Symphony, the Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra, and the Orchestra Mozart. Music of the 19th and early 20th centuries is the focus of his repertory. His interpretations of Bruckner, Mahler, and Shostakovich in particular have become benchmarks, but Haitink is equally well known for his performances of Viennese Classicism. In recent years at LUCERNE FESTIVAL, Haitink has devoted himself to cycles of the complete symphonies and concertos of Beethoven, Brahms, and Schumann. He is also associated with the Festival as an educator and since 2011 had led a master class in conducting each year at Easter. Haitink is a Knight of the British Empire, a Companion of Honour, and a member of the Order of the House of Orange-Nassau. In 2017 he received the highest civil distinction of his homeland when he was promoted to Commander of the Order of the Netherlands Lion.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 17 August 1966 with the Swiss Festival Orchestra in a program of works by Schubert, Martin, and Mahler.

    July 2018

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