Symphony Concert 1

LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA | Choirs | Riccardo Chailly | soloists

Mahler

Sat, 13.08.18.30No. 16301

KKL Luzern, Concert Hall

Vergangenes Konzert


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Summer Festival

12.08.-11.09. 2016

 

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    13.

    Aug

    Saturday
    18.30

    KKL Luzern, Concert Hall

    Symphony Concert 1

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA | Choirs | Riccardo Chailly | soloists

    Riccardo Chailly  conductor
    Ricarda Merbeth  Magna Peccatrix
    Juliane Banse  Una poenitentium
    Anna Lucia Richter  Mater gloriosa
    Sara Mingardo  Mulier Samaritana
    Mihoko Fujimura  Maria Aegyptiaca
    Andreas Schager  Doctor Marianus
    Peter Mattei  Pater ecstaticus
    Samuel Youn  Pater profundus
    Gustav Mahler (1860–1911)
    Symphony No. 8 in E-flat major Symphony of a Thousand

    “The Eternal-Feminine / Leads us onward”: These words from the final scene of Goethe’s Faust II bring Gustav Mahler’s Eighth Symphony to its conclusion – and perfectly encapsulate the 2016 Summer Festival theme. The “Eternal-Feminine” was, for Mahler, “the point of repose, the goal,” in contrast to the “Eternal-Masculine,” his term for the principle of longing and striving. He was moreover inspired by thoughts of his wife Alma, whom he described as his “harbor” and to whom he dedicated the score. Mahler does not limit himself to setting Goethe but links the work to sacred music as well, opening with the Pentecostal hymn Veni Creator Spiritus, an invocation to the Holy Spirit. That’s why he once responded to the question why he had never written church music by declaring that in fact the Eighth Symphony was his Mass …

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

    The summer of 2003 saw the birth of the LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA, which was founded by the Italian conductor Claudio Abbado and by the Festival’s Executive and Artistic Director Michael Haefliger. In creating the LFO, they established a link with the legendary elite orchestra for which Arturo Toscanini assembled acclaimed virtuosos of his time to create a magnificent ensemble, introducing it in a “Concert de Gala” in 1938, the year of the Festival’s founding. Abbado served as Music Director of the LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA up until his death in January 2014. Riccardo Chailly, who was appointed as his successor, inaugurated his tenure as the new Music Director in the summer of 2016 with two performances of Mahler’s Eighth Symphony, thus concluding the Mahler cycle that Abbado had been unable to finish. The LFO comprises internationally acclaimed principals, chamber musicians, and music teachers, as well as members of the Mahler Chamber Orchestra and the Filarmonica della Scala. For the 2017 Summer Festival, Chailly will prepare three different programs with them, presenting composers who were either not performed or seldom heard in previous LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA concerts: Richard Strauss, Felix Mendelssohn, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, and Igor Stravinsky. Many of the LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA’s performances over the last decade have been broadcast on television and then released on DVD; these have garnered such awards as the Diapason d’Or, the BBC Music Magazine Award, and the International Classical Music Award. The LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA has previously toured to many of the musical metropolises in Europe, as well as to New York, Tokyo, and Beijing. In the fall of 2017 they plan an Asian tour, with stops in Tokyo, Kawasaki, Kyoto, Seoul, and Beijing.

    The LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA has played annually at LUCERNE FESTIVAL ever since its first performances in the summer of 2003.

    April 2017

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    Bavarian Radio Choir

    Founded seventy years ago, in 1946, the Bavarian Radio Choir has been performing the great choral symphonic literature and oratorios from the Baroque to the present since then, in particular with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. The latter’s music directors have regularly been in charge of the Choir’s artistic leadership: from Eugen Jochum through Rafael Kubelík, Sir Colin Davis, and Lorin Maazel to Mariss Jansons. The ensemble is especially acclaimed for its flexibility and for the stylistic diversity of its repertoire. The singers are capable of shifting effortlessly from the austere sonority of a Renaissance madrigal to a Romantic choral work or to the technical challenges posed by contemporary music – all while preserving their signature sonic homogeneity. Through its own subscription series at the Prinzregententheater in Munich, the Choir performs not only the classic works of the canon but also crossover projects and jazz literature. Serving as Artistic Director from 2005 to the summer of 2016 was the Dutch conductor Peter Dijkstra, a self-described “anti-specialist” who ensured the diversity of the programming. In the 2016-17 season, Howard Arman will become his successor. Regular tours and invitations to the major music festivals are among the Choir’s activities; the singers have also worked with such leading European orchestras as the Berlin and Vienna Philharmonics, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam, and the Staatskapelle Dresden. They additionally perform concerts with such period-instrument ensembles as Concerto Köln, B’Rock, and the Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin. The Bavarian Radio Choir has won three Echo Klassik Awards and, in 2015, the Bavarian State Prize for Music.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 30 August 1965 with Janáčeks From the House of the Dead conducted by Rafael Kubelík.

    August 2016

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    Latvian Radio Choir

    The Latvian Radio Choir, which was founded in 1940, is dedicated to a wide repertoire from the Renaissance into the 21st century. It is especially through its performances of contemporary scores that the Choir has earned its reputation as “sonic laboratory.” The singers specialize in such vocal skills as the intonation of quarter tones and overtones, while also regularly exploring the ancient singing traditions of their homeland. A major focus of the ensemble is to promote Latvian composers, who are presented during their international performances around the world. For its recordings of the works of Ēriks Ešenvalds, Kristaps Pētersons, and Mārtiņš Viļums, the Choir won the International Rostrum of Composers Prize of Unesco’s International Music Council, and its recording of Arvo Pärt’s Adam’s Lament won the coveted Grammy Award in 2014. The Latvian Radio Choir has performed at the Baltic Sea Festival, the Salzburg Fes-tival, the Klangspuren Festival in Schwaz, and the Biennale di Venezia; it has concertized at the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Konzerthaus in Berlin, the Cité de la Musique in Paris, and Lincoln Center in New York. Among the ensemble’s conducting partners are Heinz Holliger, Tõnu Kaljuste, Stephen Layton, Lars Ulrik Mortensen, Esa-Pekka Salonen, and James Wood. Since 1992 the Latvian Radio Choir has been led by two conductors: Sigvards Kļava serves as Music Director and is supported by Kaspars Putniņš. In January 2016, under Kļava’s leadership, the Choir performed in the opening celebrations of the Latvian EU Presidency. The Choir has won the Grand Latvian Music Prize a total of nine times, most recently in 2015; in 2014 it garnered the Latvian Award of the Cabinet of Ministers, one of the country’s highest honors.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut on 30 August 2014, when the Latvian Radio Choir performed Heinz Holliger’s Scardanelli Cycle, with the composer conducting.

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    Orfeón Donostiarra

    The concert choir Orféon Donostiarra was founded in 1897 in the Basque capital of San Sebástian, whose name is “Donostia” in their native language. The Choir includes musically trained amateur singers who have set themselves the goal of giving full-scale performances of the choral-symphonic repertoire. During its first decade, the ensemble won several choral competitions, taking the Grand Prix d’Honneur in Paris in 1906. During the era of its leadership by Secundino Esnaola (1902–1929), the Choir also appeared at the Teatro Real in Madrid and performed Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony in Portugal. From 1929 to 1968, when Juan Gorostidi was Music Director, the singers performed such works as Berlioz’s Grande Messe des Morts under Charles Munch and de Falla’s Atlántida under Igor Markevitch at the Edinburgh Festival. His successor Antxon Ayestarán (1968–1986) took the Choir on tours to  Berlin and London, Israel, the United States, and the Soviet Union. Since 1987 José Antonio Sainz Alfaro has helmed the Orféon Donostiarra, further enhancing its international profile. During his tenure the Choir also worked with such conductors as Claudio Abbado, Daniel Barenboim, Paavo Järvi, Lorin Maazel, Zubin Mehta, Sir Simon Rattle, Esa-Pekka Salonen, and Michael Tilson Thomas and performed with the Berlin Philharmonic, the London Philharmonic, the London Symphony Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Israel Philharmonic, and the Orchestre National de France. In 2016 the Choir took part in the opening ceremonies celebrating San Sebástian as the European capital of culture; this summer the Choir also appears at the Orange and Carcassonne Festivals. More than 120 CDs document the artistic work of the Orféon Donostiarra.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 29 August 1964 with Orff’s Carmina Burana under the direction of Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos.

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    Tölz Boys’ Choir

    The Tölz Boys’ Choir, which originally grew out of a scout troop that took pleasure in singing, was founded sixty years ago, in 1956, by Gerhard Schmidt-Gaden, who was an 18-year-old high school student at the time. The joy of singing, together with creativity and self-discipline, remains central to the identity of the Choir, which has been rehearsing in the state capital of Munich since 1971. There some 200 boys are trained on four levels by artistic directors Christian Fliegner and Clemens Haudum; by the director of the soloist section, Ursula Richter; and by eight vocal teachers. After their voices break, the members are vocally engaged as part of a male choir. Schmidt-Gaden, who headed them until 2009, supports the team with help and advice. Every year these young singers give up to 250 concert and opera performances around the world, covering music from the Middle Ages to the modern era. Soloists from the Tölz Boys’ Choir have become famous performing the Three Boys in Mozart’s The Magic Flute – no fewer than 12 CDs and DVDs of the opera have cast their voices. Such conductors as Claudio Abbado, Daniel Barenboim, Leonard Bernstein, Sergiu Celibidache, Riccardo Chailly, Mariss Jansons, Herbert von Karajan, James Levine, Riccardo Muti, Sir Georg Solti, and Christian Thielemann have worked with the Tölz Boys’ Choir. Gustav Leonhardt and Nikolaus Harnoncourt have recorded the Bach cantatas with the ensemble. The Choir’s recordings have won such awards
    as the German Record Critics’ Prize (Bach’s Christmas Oratorio), the Echo Klassik (Orlando di Lasso’s The Psalms of David), and the Diapason d’Or (Bach’s St. John Passion). The Tölz Boys’ Choir is supported by the Free State of Bavaria and by the City of Bad Tölz.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 27 August 1971 in Krzysztof Penderecki’s oratorio Utrenja conducted by Zdenĕk Mácal.

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    Riccardo Chailly

    Riccardo Chailly has been the LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA’s new Music Director since the summer of 2016. Born in 1953 in Milan, he studied at the Conservatories of Perugia, Rome, and Milan and at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana and began his career as an assistant to Claudio Abbado at La Scala in Milan. Chailly was appointed Music Director of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra in 1980, and in 1988 he moved to the same position with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam, which he helmed for sixteen years. From 2005 to the summer of 2016, Riccardo Chailly served as head of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, and since January 2015 he has been Music Director of La Scala in Milan. Chailly regularly conducts such leading European orchestras as the Berlin and Vienna Philharmonics, the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, the London Symphony Orchestra, and the Orchestre de Paris. In the United States he has worked with the New York Philharmonic, the Cleveland and Philadelphia Orchestras, and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. As an opera conductor – in addition to his performances at La Scala – he has appeared at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, the Royal Opera House in London, Zurich Opera, the Bavarian and Vienna Staatsoper companies, Chicago Lyric Opera, and San Francisco Opera. Riccardo Chailly has received many prizes for his more than 150 CDs, including two Echo Klassik Awards (in 2012 and 2015); Gramophone magazine chose his account of the Brahms symphonies as Recording of the Year in 2014. Riccardo Chailly is a Grand’Ufficiale della Repubblica Italiana, Cavaliere di Gran Croce, and Cavaliere dell’Ordine del Leone d’Olanda. In 1996 he was made an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Music in London, and in France he has been an Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France since 2011.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 7 September 1988 with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in a program of works by Wagenaar, Mozart, and Tchaikovsky.

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    Ricarda Merbeth

    Following her vocal training at the Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy Academy of Music in Leipzig, the soprano Ricarda Merbeth, who was born near Chemnitz, was engaged by the Municipal Theater in Magdeburg and subsequently by the Deutsches Nationaltheater Weimar. From 1999 to 2005 she belonged to the Vienna Staatsoper ensemble, where she enjoys a regular connection to the present and where she has since been named a Kammersängerin. There she has become known especially for her performances of roles by Mozart (the Countess in Figaro and Donna Anna in Don Giovanni), Wagner (including Eva in Die Meistersinger, Elsa in Lohengrin, and Sieglinde in Die Walküre), and Richard Strauss (the Marschallin in Der Rosenkavalier, Chrysothemis in Elektra,and the title role in Daphne). In 2000 Merbeth made her debut at the Bayreuth Festival: initially she sang Freia in Das Rheingold there, and, in the years following, she has undertaken the roles of Gutrune in Götterdämmerung, Elisabeth in Tannhäuser, and (since 2013) Senta in Der fliegende Holländer. Other credits include with Dresden Semperoper, Deutsche Oper Berlin, and Bavarian Staatsoper. Merbeth sang her first Fidelio Leonore in 2011 at Zurich Opera. She made her debut as Marie in Berg’s Wozzeck at the end of 2015 at La Scala in Milan, while with Wagner’s Isolde, which she sang in the spring of 2016 for the first time at Hamburg Staatsoper, she embarked on the high dramatic repertoire, which she will continue to pursue in the coming year with Brünnhilde in The Ring. Merbeth has also performed contemporary works, most recently in May 2016, when she sang Goneril in Aribert Reimann’s Lear at the Opéra National de Paris. She has appeared in concerts with such conductors as Vladimir Fedoseyev, Bernard Haitink, and Philippe Jordan.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut on 2 September 2007, when she sang Freia in a concert performance of Wagner’s Das Rheingold with the Bamberg Symphony under Jonathan Nott.

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    Juliane Banse

    The soprano Juliane Banse, who was born in southern Germany and grew up in Zurich, initially studied with Paul Steiner and Ruth Rohner, before competing her training with Brigitte Fassbaender and Daphne Evangelatos. She was only 20 when she made her debut as Pamina in The Magic Flute at the Komische Oper in Berlin; this was followed by engagements with the Vienna and Bavarian Staatsoper companies and with Zurich Opera, where she made her triumphant debut in 1998 in the world premiere of Holliger’s Schneewittchen (“Snow White”). Originally at home in lyrical soprano roles, today Banse’s repertoire also encompasses such roles as the Countess in Figaro, which she first performed in 2006 at the Salzburg Festival, Fiordiligi in Così fan tutte, Donna Elvira in Don Giovanni, Schumann’s Genoveva, Tatyana in Eugene Onegin, and Grete in Schreker’s Der ferne Klang. In 2014 she sang Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus at Lyric Opera of Chicago and made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Zdenka in Strauss’s Arabella. In the 2015-16 season she took on the title role in Grigory Frid’s Diary of Anne Frank at the Theater an der Wien and appeared as Braunfels’ Saint Joan in Cologne. At the latter she will also perform Poulencs La voix humaine in the coming season; she will additionally sing Angèle Didier in a new production of Lehár’s  The Count of Luxembourg at Deutsche Oper am Rhein. Juliane Banse worked for many years with Claudio Abbado; she has also concertized with Pierre Boulez, Riccardo Chailly, Bernard Haitink, Mariss Jansons, Lorin Maazel, Zubin Mehta, and Franz Welser-Möst. She is moreover a celebrated lieder interpreter, as demonstrated by her multiple-award-winning CDs. She is the recipient of two Echo Klassik Awards: for Braunfels’ Jeanne d’Arc and for Mahler’s Eighth under David Zinman.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 5 September 1996 with the lieder project Du holde Kunst (“Oh Lovely Art”).

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    Anna Lucia Richter

    The German soprano Anna Lucia Richter, who was born in 1990, comes from a major musical family. After her initial vocal training with her mother, Regina Dohmen, she studied with Kurt Widmer and Klesie Kelly-Moog. She won the Mendelssohn Prize in 2011 and, in 2012, the International Robert Schumann Competition in Zwickau. She is a passionate lieder singer and has appeared in recitals at the Heidelberg Spring Festival, the Schubertiade in Schwarzenberg, and the Ruhrtriennale and at Wigmore Hall in London, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, and the Park Avenue Armory in New York. She has worked with such pianists as Hartmut Höll, Gerold Huber, and Igor Levit. Wolfgang Rihm composed his song cycle Ophelia Sings for her. On the opera stage, Richter has performed Zerlina in Don Giovanni at Deutsche Oper am Rhein and Pamina in Die Zauberflöte at the Aalto Theater in Essen. She sang Eurydice and La Musica in a production of Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo staged by Sasha Waltz and conducted by Pablo Heras-Casado. In the spring of 2017 she sang in Henze’s Elegie for Young Lovers at the Theater an der Wien; at the opening of the 2017-18 season she will appear as Servilia in Mozart’s La clemenza di Tito under Teodor Currentzis in Bremen, Geneva, Dortmund, and Paris. Anna Lucia Richter’s credits in the concert hall include with the London Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam, the Orchestre de Paris, the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, and the Staatskapelle Dresden. She has recorded an album of Eichendorff lieder, Brahms’s Requiem, and Schumann’s Der Rose Pilgerfahrt. Anna Lucia Richter won the Borletti Buitoni Trust Award in 2016.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut at the opening concert of the 2015 Summer Festival, when she sang in Mahler’s Fourth Symphony with the LUCERNE FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA under Bernard Haitink.

    June 2017

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    Sara Mingardo

    The alto Sara Mingardo studied with Franco Ghitti at the Benedetto Marcello Conservatory of Music in her native Venice, completing her train-ing at the Accademia Chigiana in
    Siena. She began her career in 1987 as the winner of the Concorso Toti dal Monte and made her stage debut the same year as Fidalma in a production of Cimarosa’s Il matrimonio segreto in Avezzano. She subsequently soon began appearing at the leading Italian and European opera companies and at the Salzburg Festival and the Festi
    val d’Aix-en-Provence. With her warm, dark timbre and resonant deeper range, Mingardo belongs to the rare species of the true contralto and is considered an ideal performer of the works of Monteverdi, Handel, Gluck, Mozart, Rossini, and Berlioz. A prominent role in her career is reserved for early music, which she frequently performs with ensembles devoted to historically informed performance practice and with such conductors as Rinaldo Alessandrini, Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Emmanuelle Haïm, Marc Minkowski, Sir Roger Norrington, Christophe Rousset, and Jordi Savall. She also concertizes with traditional symphony orchestras, including the Berlin Philharmonic, the London and Boston Symphony Orchestras, and the Orchestre National de France. She enjoyed a close partnership with Claudio Abbado, with whom she collaborated on a Pergolesi cycle and also recorded Mozart’s Requiem. In the 2016-17 season she will appear as Ottone in Monteverdi’s L’incoronazione di Poppea at La Scala in Milan and as Disinganno in Handel’s Il trionfo del tempo at the Deutsche Staatsoper Berlin; she will also appear at the Teatro Regio in Turin in a new production of Vivaldi’s L’incoronazione di Dario. In 2009 the Italian Music Critics’ Association honored Sara Mingardo with the Premio Abbiati.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut singing in Mozart’s Requiem in the opening concert for the 2012 Summer Festival.

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    Mihoko Fujimura

    The mezzo-soprano Mihoko Fujimura comes from Gifu Prefecture in Japan and began her vocal training at the National University for Music in Tokyo. After transferring to the Munich Music Academy, where she graduated from the voice class of Josef Loibl and took master classes with Hans Hotter, she completed her studies in 1995 and began her career at Graz Opera, where she was a member of the ensemble for five years. Fujimura celebrated her international breakthrough as a Wagner singer, making her debut in 2000 as Brangäne in Tristan at the Vienna Staats-
    oper, as Fricka and Waltraute in the Ring at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, and in the summer of 2002 as Fricka at the Bayreuth Festival. She has performed several times at Bayreuth, appearing as Erda, Kundry, and Brangäne. Fujimura’s operatic repertoire is not limited to German repertoire: she has also performed roles by Mozart and Verdi. As a performer of contemporary music, she recently took part, in January 2016, in the premiere of Toshio Hosokawa’s Fukushima opera Stilles Meer at Hamburg Staatsoper. Other credits include at the Royal Opera House in London, La Scala in Milan, the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris, the Maggio Musicale in Florence, Bavarian Staatsoper, and the Festival d’Aix-en-Provence. In the concert realm Fujimura has become known especially as a Mahler performer, working with such conductors as Claudio Abbado, Christoph Eschenbach, Bernard Haitink, Mariss Jansons, Andris Nelsons, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Sir Simon Rattle, and Christian Thielemann. Fujimura was named Singer of the Year in Japan in 2001 and was awarded the Purple Ribbon of Honor by the Japanese government in 2014 for her artistic achievements.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut on 13 August 2004 as Brangäne in the second act of Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde under Claudio Abbaddo.

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    Andreas Schager

    Andreas Schager, who was born in 1971 in Lower Austria, studied with Walter Moore at the Vienna University for Music and made his opera debut as Ferrando in Così fan tutte at the Mozart in Schönbrunn Festival. He started his career as a lyric tenor with the ensemble of the United City Stages of Krefeld and Mönchengladbach. He soon began performing at the Wiener Festwochen, the Teatro Comunale di Bologna, Oper Köln, and the Royal Opera in Canada. With David in Die Meistersinger, which he performed in 2009 at the Tyrol Festival in Erl, Schager undertook his first Wagner role. In 2011 he moved to the heldentenor repertoire, initially with such roles as Wagner’s Rienzi, Florestan in Beethoven’s Fidelio, and Max in Weber’s Der Freischütz. In 2012 he made his debut as Wagner’s Tristan and as Siegfried in The Ring – two key roles of his repertoire, which he has subsequently sung at many leading opera houses, including the Staatsoper Berlin, La Scala in Milan, and the Mariinsky Theater in St. Petersburg. In the 2015-16 season Schager appeared as Parsifal in Berlin, Siegmund in Die Walküre at Leipzig Opera, and Tannhäuser at Flemish Opera in Antwerp. In the summer of 2016 he appeared for the first time at the Bayreuth Festival as Erik in Der fliegende Holländer and has been engaged there for 2017 and 2018 as Parsifal. With the Cleveland Orchestra under Franz Welser-Möst, Schager has performed Apollo in Strauss’s Daphne in New York; at Frankfurt Opera he took part in another rarely performed Strauss opera when he sang Menelas in Die Ägyptische Helena. His concert repertoire includes such works as Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde, and Schoenberg’s Gurre-Lieder.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut on 4 September 2013 as Siegfried in a concert performance of Wagner’s Götterdämmerung with the Bamberg Symphony under Jonathan Nott. 

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    Peter Mattei

    The Swedish baritone Peter Mattei, who was born in 1965 in Piteå, completed his vocal training in Stockholm and made his stage debut in 1990 at the Drottningholm Palace Theater in the role of Nardo in Mozart’s La finta giardiniera. He was soon engaged by the Royal Opera in Stockholm, where he sang Mozart’s Figaro for the first time in the 1994-95 season; he made his debut as Don Giovanni in the same season in Gothenburg. Mozart and especially the three Da Ponte operas remain the focus of his artistic work to the present. He has performed them at such venues as the Aix-en-Provence, Glyndebourne, and Salzburg Festivals; La Scala in Milan; and the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Mattei’s repertoire additionally includes such works as Rossini’s Il barbiere di Siviglia (Figaro), Puccini’s La bohème (Marcello), Tchaikovsky’s Queen of Spades (Yeletsky), and Janáček’s From the House of the Dead (Šiškov). He has sung Tchai-
    kovsky’s Eugene Onegin at the Salzburg Festival and the title role in a new production of Britten’s Billy Budd at Frankfurt Opera. In the past season Mattei appeared as Wolfram in Wagner’s Tannhäuser at the Metropolitan Opera and as Amfortas (Parsifal) in Stockholm. In the 2016-17 season he will perform Marquis Posa in Verdi’s Don Carlo at Zurich Opera and Eugene Onegin at the Opéra National de Paris. Peter Mattei is a sought-after concert singer and has worked with such conductors as Claudio Abbado, Daniel Barenboim, Riccardo Chailly, Daniel Harding, Riccardo Muti, Sir Antonio Pappano, Esa-Pekka Salonen, and Sir Georg Solti. His discography includes a recording of Berlioz’s Les Troyens, on which he sings Chorèbe; it was conducted by Sir
    Colin Davis and garnered two Grammy Awards. In 2004 Mattei was named a Court Singer by the King of Sweden. 

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut as Don Fernando in the performance of  Beethoven’s Fidelio whichClaudio Abbado conducted at the opening of the 2010 Summer Festival.

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    Samuel Youn

    Born in 1971 in Seoul, the bass-baritone Samuel Youn studied voice in his native city, at the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory in Milan, and with Arthur Janzen at the Music Academy of Cologne. It was in the opera studio of Cologne Opera that this winner of numerous international competitions began his career; in 1999 he became a member of the company’s permanent ensemble, to which he continues to belong. In Cologne Youn has sung many major heldenbaritone roles, including Escamillo in Bizet’s Carmen, Jochanaan in Strauss’s Salome, Pizarro in Beethoven’s Fidelio, such Verdi parts as Attila, Amonasro in Aida, and Jago in Otello – and of course the Wagner repertoire. He began performing at the Bayreuth Festival in 2004, when Youn made his debut in Parsifal; from 2010 to 2015 his roles there included the Herald in Lohengrin, and from 2012 to 2015 he also sang the title role in Der fliegende Holländer. Other credits include Scar-pia in Puccini’s Tosca at the Royal Opera House in London, Orest in Strauss’s Elektra at the Teatro Real in Madrid, Donner in Wagner’s Das
    Rheingold at the Opéra National de Paris, the four evil characters in Offenbach’s Les Contes d’Hoffmann in Toulouse, and Kaspar in Weber’s Der Freischütz at Hamburg Staatsoper. In the coming season Youn will make his debut at Chicago Lyric Opera as Alberich in Das Rheingold; at Deutsche Oper in Berlin he will sing the Wanderer in Siegfried. Samuel Youn has worked with such conductors as Pierre Boulez, Semyon Bychkov, Zu
    bin Mehta, and Christian Thielemann. The Friends of Opera Cologne awarded the singer their Offenbach Prize in 2005; in 2014 he won the Cologne Opera Prize. 

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    17.00 | Lecture by Susanne Stähr | Auditorium | free admission

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