Symphony Concert 25

London Symphony Orchestra and Chorus | Sir Simon Rattle | soloists

Mahler

Tue, 08.09. | 19.30 | No. 20353

KKL Luzern, Concert Hall

Tickets as from Mon, 23 March 2020 | 12.00 (UTC + 1)


Please book a wheelchair ticket under t +41 (0) 41 226 44 80 (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

Summer Festival

14.08.-13.09. 2020

 

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    Symphony Concert 25

    London Symphony Orchestra and Chorus | Sir Simon Rattle | soloists

    Sir Simon Rattle  conductor
    Elsa Dreisig  soprano
    Gustav Mahler (1860–1911)
    Symphony No. 2 in C minor (Resurrection)

    London Symphony Orchestra

    The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) was founded in 1904 as the first self-governing orchestra in England and soon won an outstanding reputation around the world. Over the course of recent decades, André Previn (1968–79), Claudio Abbado (1979–88), Michael Tilson Thomas (1988–95), Sir Colin Davis (1995–2007), and Valery Gergiev (2007–15) have served as leaders of the LSO. Sir Simon Rattle began his tenure as the new Music Director in 2017; Gianandrea Noseda and François-Xavier Roth act as Principal Guest Conductors. The London Symphony Orchestra annually presents more than sixty concerts at the Barbican Centre, which has been its permanent home since 1982. Residencies regularly take the musicians to Lincoln Center in New York, the Paris Philharmonie, and Suntory Hall in Tokyo. They additionally give performances around the world: most recently, in May 2019, they toured to South America and made stops in Colombia, Peru, Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile. For the 2019-20 season, Rattle will focus on works by Beethoven, Bartók, and Percy Grainger; guest conductors will include such figures as Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Sir Antonio Pappano, and Michael Tilson Thomas. The LSO attaches particular importance to innovative and broadly impactful programming for audiences of all ages and educational levels. Through these projects, which take place under the title “LSO Discovery” in St. Luke’s Church, the LSO reaches 65,000 listeners each season. These activities span family concerts, school projects, a collaboration with the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and the series “Discovery Days.” The Orchestra has its own label, LSO Live, which has released more than 150 recordings to date. These have garnered such distinctions as the Grammy Award, the Classical Brit Award, the Orphée d’or, and the German Record Critics’ Prize.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 3. September 1982, with Claudio Abbado conducting Elgar’s Cello Concerto and Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique.

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    London Symphony Chorus

    The London Symphony Chorus was founded in 1966 with the mission of performing vocal symphonic works jointly with the London Symphony Orchestra. At the same time, the Chorus, which currently includes some 150 singers, is not a subordinate part of the Orchestra but an independent organization and therefore also collaborates with other ensembles and institutions. At the center of its repertoire are the large-scale works of the 19th and 20th centuries, beginning with Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, continuing through Rossini’s and Dvořák’s Stabat Mater settings, the Brahms Requiem, and Mahler’s symphonies to Elgar’s The Dream of Gerontius, Britten’s War Requiem, and Tippett’s A Child of Our Time. More than 140 recordings document the work of the London Symphony Chorus; they have received no fewer than five Grammy Awards. The 2018-19 season will include performances of such works as Britten’s Spring Symphony with Sir Simon Rattle, Haydn’s Lord Nelson Mass with François-Xavier Roth, Bern-
    stein’s Candide with Marin Alsop, and music by Charles Ives with Michael Tilson Thomas. The London Symphony Chorus has been directed by Simon Halsey since 2012. A native of London who was born in 1958, Halsey is a longtime associate of Sir Simon Rattle. They already started working together during Rattle’s tenure with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, whose chorus Halsey continues to direct. In later years, when Halsey helmed the Rundfunkchor Berlin from 2001 to 2015, they collaborated on numerous projects with the Berlin Philharmonic. This partnership now continues with concerts with the London Symphony Orchestra, including such opera performances as Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen, which they will perform in 2019.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 28 August 1986 with Mozart’s Requiem led by Ulrich Meyer-Schoellkopf.

    July 2018

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    Sir Simon Rattle

    Sir Simon Rattle has been serving as Music Director of the London Symphony Orchestra since 2017. Born in 1955 in Liverpool, he studied piano, percussion, and orchestral conducting at the Royal Academy of Music in London. In 1980 he began a close collaboration with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, which he helmed as Music Director from 1990 to 1998, building it into a top international ensemble. In 2002 he became Chief Conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, whose repertoire he gradually expanded during his 16-year tenure, which ended in 2018, by integrating contemporary music and staged performances as well as Baroque works and rarities from music history. Many of these concerts were released as live CD recordings and have garnered awards. His education program in Berlin has also won acclaim, including the Comenius Award and the Schiller Prize of the City of Mannheim. Since 1992 Sir Simon has also been closely associated with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and is currently its Principal Artist; he has additionally conducted the leading orchestras of Europe and the U.S. He made his debut as an opera conductor in 1977 at the Glyndebourne Festival. Additional engagements have taken him to the Opéra national de Paris, Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Dutch National Opera, Vienna Staatsoper, and New York’s Metropolitan Opera. He regularly collaborates with the Staatsoper Berlin, where he recently conducted Rameau’s Hippolyte et Aricie (2018); he will lead Mozart’s Idomeneo there in the 2019-20 season and will also conduct Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier at the Metropolitan Opera. Simon Rattle was made a Knight Bachelor by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994; he holds the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany and is a Knight of the French Legion of Honor. He received the Léonie Sonning Music Prize in 2013 and the Freedom of the City of London in 2018.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL (IMF) debut on 8 September 1996 with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra conducting works by Berlioz, Beethoven, Tippett, and Haydn.

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    Elsa Dreisig

    The soprano Elsa Dreisig, who was born in 1991 in Paris, comes from a French-Danish family. She attended the choral school of the Opéra royal de Wallonie and of the Opéra national de Lyon. Later, she studied voice with Valérie Guillorit at the Conservatoire national supérieur de musique in Paris and with Regina Werner at the Leipzig Academy of Music. She won the “Des Mots et des Notes” competition in 2012 and the “Ton und Erklärung” competition in 2014. In 2016 she took first prize as best singer at Plácido Domingo’s Operalia. Shortly after, the Victoires de la Musique in Paris named her “Vocal Discovery of the Year,” and the magazine Opernwelt selected her as emerging artist of the season. Dreisig made her stage debut in the 2013-14 season in Lortzing’s Wildschütz at the Leipzig Academy of Music; in the year following came her first performance at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris. From 2015 to 2017, she belonged to the Staatsoper Berlin Opera Studio, after which Daniel Barenboim engaged her as a permanent member of the company. Since then she has appeared there as Gretel in Humperdinck’s Hänsel und Gretel, Pamina in Mozart’s Magic Flute, Violetta Valéry in Verdi’s La traviata, and Eurydice in Gluck’s Orpheus. In the 2018-19 season, she will take part in a new production of Rameau’s Hippolyte et Aricie led by Sir Simon Rattle, will sing Dircé in Cherubini’s Médée, and will be part of the ensemble for the world premiere of Beat Furrer’s Violetter Schnee. In 2017 Elsa Dreisig made her debut as Micaëla in Bizet’s Carmen at the Festival d’Aix-en-Pro-vence. She has sung Musetta in Puccini’s La bohème at Zurich Opera and, in May and June 2018, appeared as Lauretta in Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi at the Opéra national de Paris.

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    Elisabeth Kulman

    Elisabeth Kulman, who was born in 1973 in Burgenland, Austria, initially focused on Slavic languages and Finno-Ugric Studies in Vienna, but in 1995 she decided to study singing with Helena Lazarska and graduated with distinction in 2001. In the same year, Kulman made her debut at the Vienna Volksoper as Pamina in The Magic Flute, launching a successful career as a soprano. In 2005 she made a transition to the mezzo and alto repertoires, which she has sung ever since. Credits include Gluck’s Orpheus at the Opéra national de Paris and the Salzburg Festival; Prince Orlofsky (Die Fledermaus), Mrs. Quickly (Falstaff), and Herodias (Salome) at the Vienna Staatsoper; and Carmen at the Berlin Staatsoper. Kulman covers an historical and stylistic spectrum that ranges from Baroque opera and bel canto through Richard Wagner to contemporary music. She performed in Offenbach’s Barbe-Bleue at the styriarte as well as in a Mozart-Da Ponte cycle at the Theater an der Wien with Nikolaus Harnoncourt. Herbert Blomstedt, Mariss Jansons, Zubin Mehta, Kirill Petrenko, Sir Simon Rattle, and Christian Thielemann are also among her partners on the podium. Since 2015, Kulman has concentrated her artistic activities on lieder recitals, concerts, and concert opera performances. These also include such interdisciplinary programs as Mussorgsky Dis-Covered with a jazz quartet, Mahler Lieder with the Ensemble Amarcord Wien, and Hungaro Tune with symphony orchestra and jazz soloists. Her most recent project is the “multi-genre music show” La femme c’est moi, which she performed in the 2018-19 season in Munich, Vienna, and Tokyo as well as at the Heidelberger Frühling Festival. Elisabeth Kulman is committed to the “art but fair” initiative, which advocates better working conditions for artists.

    LUCERNE FESTIVAL debut in the summer of 2013 as Fricka and Waltraute in Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen.

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